Emergency Care

Emergency Care

Floyd Medical Center is a state-designated Level II Trauma Center that provides around-the-clock emergency care, seven days a week. Our Emergency Care Center is specially equipped to treat patients with acute and life-threatening traumatic injuries, with access to the following services: 

  • Anesthesiology
  • Critical care
  • Emergency medicine
  • General surgery
  • Neurosurgery
  • Orthopedic surgery
  • Radiology

Additionally, Floyd Urgent Care centers are located throughout the community to provide care during extend hours and weekends for medical issues that are urgent but not life-threatening. 

Commonly Asked Emergency Care Questions

When should I call 911? 
If you or a loved one has a life- or limb-threatening condition or symptoms consistent with stroke or heart attack, call 911 immediately. If you are unsure of the level of care needed and it is during business hours, call your primary care physician or go to the nearest Urgent Care center. 

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What is trauma?
Trauma is a life- or limb-threatening physical injury caused by an external force such as a motor vehicle crash, violence or a fall. Trauma patients who receive appropriate care within 60 minutes after injury–the Golden Hour–chances of survival increase considerably.

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When should I go to urgent care?
Many people come to the emergency room when an urgent care center might have been the better, and quicker, choice.

Urgent Care is recommended for conditions and symptoms such as:

  • First or second-degree burns
  • Colds, cough or flu
  • Eye, ear or skin infections
  • Fractures
  • Minor cuts, bruises and abrasions
  • Respiratory infections
  • Strains or sprains
  • Urinary tract infections

Our Urgent Care centers are staffed by qualified physicians and nurses. Most centers are open evenings, weekends and holidays. Urgent Care centers are a good choice when you need to see a physician after hours or without an appointment.

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What is triage?
Triage is the process of sorting and prioritizing patients based on their medical needs. When you come to the emergency room, a staff member will ask questions about the patient’s illness, injury or medical history and will perform a brief exam to determine the severity of the condition. The physician will see patients with the most critical conditions first.

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What happens after check in? 
The admitting staff will ask for additional information to complete a patient record. The triage nurse may begin treatment and provide comfort by offering bandages, ice or certain medications. Certain diagnostic tests may also be ordered at this time.

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Can patients eat or drink anything while waiting to be seen?
Patients should not eat or drink anything until a physician or nurse has given approval.

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Why is there a wait to be seen?
Our Emergency Care Center sees between 70,000 and 80,000 patients each year–that's over 200 patients a day. Patients are triaged to ensure the most serious medical conditions are treated first. Unfortunately, patients with less serious needs may have to wait while those patients receive care. Our Emergency Care Center staff works hard to ensure all patients are seen in a timely manner and to keep wait times to a minimum.

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What happens after being taken to a room?
A nurse examine the patient fully and complete a medical history. After the physician examines the patient, additional tests or treatments may be ordered. Based on the test results and the patient’s current condition, the physician will make a decision to either let the patient go home or to admit the patient to the hospital.

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Do patients have to wait for a bed once admitted to the hospital?
Wait times depend on the number of available beds and the type and location of bed the physician has requested.

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Are visitors allowed in the emergency room?
Visitors are welcome at the hospital depending on the patient’s condition. Pastoral care is welcome to support and comfort the patient and family.

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Are children allowed in the emergency department?
Yes, if they are supervised by an adult who can care for them. If small children are present, please do not allow them to play near cars or ambulances. Children should not be left unattended.

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What about pain relief while in the emergency department?
Each person feels and tolerates pain differently. Pain that does not go away, can be a sign of trouble. Patients with unmanaged pain should notify their nurse.

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Where can patients or visitors provide feedback?
Our goal is to provide the absolute best medical care, with the utmost compassion. Our Patient Advocates will check on patients and their visitors regularly to meet needs and answer questions. Let the Patient Advocate or another member of our staff know of any concerns. In addition, we have engaged a third-party company to randomly survey our patients to continually improve the care we provide.

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What about follow-up care?
Examination and treatment in the emergency department is not a substitute for ongoing medical care. Patients will receive instructions for follow-up care when they are discharged. It is essential to follow these instructions. Please let the nurse or Patient Advocate know if the patient does not have a personal physician.

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