Male Breast Health

Male Breast Health

Although rare, breast cancer can develop in men.

Everybody has breast tissue, and about one in every 1,000 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Though the chances seem remote, men should not ignore the risk.

Because breast cancer is usually discovered later in men, the mortality rate is higher in men.

While there are no routine recommendations for breast cancer screening in men, it is important for men to be aware of their family history and report any family history components or physical changes to their health care provider.

Family History

  • Have a close male relative who was diagnosed with breast cancer at any age.
  • Have a close male or female relative with a known BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 genetic mutation. Men can be carriers of these genetic alterations and may be at elevated risk for developing breast or other related cancers.

Physical Changes

  • Any changes in the breast or chest area, particularly when the change is only on one side of the chest
  • Lump, hard knot or thickening on the breast, chest or underarm area
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling, puckering or redness of the breast skin
  • Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
  • Inverted nipple

Contact

To learn more or to request a consultation, contact The Breast Center at Floyd at 706.509.6840 or email us.

Joe Coots Knows Males Get Breast Cancer, Too